Skip to main content

The first post is the hardest.

Part of me wants start off by laying out my manifesto on marketing, advertising, copywriting, the power of words, how they relate to one another, and all the other context. But if I got all that out of the way I would never be in a position to just say what I want to say.

The only context that is needed is this: some people are of the opinion that all marketing is bullshit. The thing is: while I see where they're coming from, I don't think that's true.



In Spielberg's A.I. Artificial Intelligence (awkward punctuation for an awkward film) the android protagonist's mother uses a seven word protocol (like a Golem, I only just realized). And then the trouble starts.

Though I don't have much patience for the film, I do like what this scene communicates: that there's a certain combination of words that can cause people to act in specific ways.

I spend a good chunk of my day coming up to find the right words grouped into the right combination to have the right effect. "To compel the audience to take the desired action."

Finding the right words takes time. Words carry power. And people see through bullshit and manipulation, so shortcuts rarely work.

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Reading Raj Patel’s “The Value of Nothing” in an advertising context.

The more I read about the theory of advertising (which is plenty, thanks to my upcoming IPA Eff Test), the more it seems just inextricably linked to other disciplines.
Psychology and sociology are pretty much a given – the better we understand how people’s minds and social structures work, the better we can sell to them. But there’s also a huge economic dimension to advertising.
Specifically, so much of advertising relates to the process of value creation. Though my Comparative Literature course included ample Marx, Engels, Veblen, and Benjamin, it’s a concept that I’m still working to fully understand.
That’s why I was very happy to come across Raj Patel’s The Value of Nothing. At its core, it’s a fundamental examination of why things cost what they do – though it also goes far beyond that as the subtitle, “How to reshape market society and redefine democracy,” suggests.
One of the best parts is where Patel explains why “a burger grown from beef raised on clear-cut forest should really c…

Digested Read: How (Not) To Plan, Section 2.

Product, Price, Place!
Introduction
Marketers tend to focus overly much on Promotion, ignoring other three Ps.
2.1 Brands Can(not) Live Forever
"Brands don't have life cycles," a theory which the longevity of Heinz, Kellogg's, and Hovis apparently support.

"If there is any 'life cycle,' it's a brand management cycle."

Phase 1: Brand launch with strong marketing support and ROI.

Phase 2: Sales plateau – marketing needs to maintain and depend the brand and gets less management attention; budgets are cut.

Phase 3: The cuts lead to declining sales; brand owners retaliate with price promotions which deliver short-term sales but damage the brand image (further affecting sales).

The Boston Matrix of Cash Cows and Stars should be applied to categories, not brands.
Checklist

"Aim for brand immortality"
Always invest in continuous advertising [Comment: A recurrent theme]
Share and Voice and Share of Market can help you estimate how much you need to spend to …

Digested Read: How (Not) To Plan, Section 1.

New year = new ventures – in my case, this includes a series of digested reads, with a focus on ad strategy books. I'm kicking it off with the APG's How (Not) To Plan.

Firstly: the book is already a digested read, so this will be the super-distilled version. I'll tackle it section by section.

Section 1 is all about Setting Objectives.
Introduction
"Effective communication starts with agreeing with your clients what it's supposed to do. [O]ften, this stage is rushed, fudged, based on flawed thinking or skipped altogether."
1.1 How (Not) To Make a Plan
The authors talk about how "marketing objectives [...] have lost their grip on reality." However, "there is evidence from the IPA Databank that better objective setting leads to more effective campaigns. Best practice is to identify exactly what business results you want. And exactly what you need people to think, feel, and do to deliver those results." Also? "A campaign can't deliver unles…